Suffolk Police investigating hate crime arson outside of mosque

Suffolk Police are investigating an arson attack in the car park of a mosque as a hate crime.

Officers responded to calls of a burning wheelie bin at 4 am on May 17 in the car park of a mosque in Camps Road.

The police confirmed that no injuries occurred as the investigation remains ongoing.

As protocol, Tell MAMA has safety and security advice for mosques and Islamic institutions – which covers the value of CCTV for evidence gathering and what to do in situations with individuals who may seek to harm worshippers or the mosque infrastructure.

High-resolution copies are available from the Resources section of our website. If you’d like free copies of such resources sent in the post, email info@tellmamauk.org

Suffolk Police request that anyone with information get in touch online or over the phone on 101, quoting crime ref 37/29904/22. Members of the public can email the investigating officer at ashley.gorbutt1@suffolk.police.uk

For those wishing to remain anonymous, the charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or online.

Or, if you prefer that we at Tell MAMA contact the Metropolitan Police anonymously or on your behalf, get in touch via our website, or call our freephone on 0800 456 1226.

The post Suffolk Police investigating hate crime arson outside of mosque appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: hate crime, mosque, News, Suffolk

Definition of Anti-Muslim Hatred

Faith Matters has watched the difficult and abrasive debates that have taken place around the development of a definition on anti-Muslim hatred or prejudice by this Government.

We are of the firm opinion that a definition is essential if we are to ensure that some fundamentals of our society are to be protected. Firstly, there needs to be a common definition that lets the public know what anti-Muslim hatred is and what it ‘looks like’ and ‘sounds like’. This definition also needs to be framed so that it fits into existing legislation and does not become an exercise in producing a piece of text that has no legal relevance.

Secondly, the debate rumbles on about ensuring that any definition does not stop critique of religion or faith. This also covers Islam. People have the right to critique or even dislike any faith. What they don’t have the right to do, is to attack, harm of hurt people who happen to be Muslim.

This is essential to lay out though there is a common agreement amongst many, that the definition must protect individuals and their rights to live freely without fear, harm or intimidation, as British Muslims. This does not mean that criticism of Islam is anti-Muslim, though we also acknowledge that each issue must be taken on a case by case basis and if criticism of Islam turns into targeted hatred towards Muslims, then such behaviour is not protected under the rights of free speech. At this stage, it should not be tolerated.

For far too long, there has been inaction on this and we urge the Government to take urgent action to move this process along. We must also commend the Government on the actions that they have taken in the last few days on the launch of a security fund for mosques and Islamic institutions, given the targeting of mosques by anti-Muslim activists and bigots. Furthermore, we acknowledge the work that Government has done to support the monitoring of anti-Muslim prejudice and support for victims of it, through Tell MAMA.

The post Definition of Anti-Muslim Hatred appeared first on Faith Matters.

Categories: British Muslims, Definition of Anti-Muslim hatred, Government, security fund

Neo-Nazi Alex Davies guilty of belonging to banned terror group National Action

The other co-founder of the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action was today (May 17) guilty of remaining a member of the proscribed group.

Alex Davies, 27, from Swansea, created the terror group alongside Benjamin Raymond (jailed for eight years in December 2021 for the same offence) in 2013.

Davies formed the National Action offshoot NS131 and had praised the System Resistance Network; both groups, alongside Scottish Dawn, all faced the same fate: proscription.

National Action (proscribed December 2016 – who never hid their desire to rebrand, writing on VK in 2016, “We will fight this in the courts or disband and organise under a new name”)

Scottish Dawn (proscribed September 2017)

NS131 (proscribed September 2017)

System Resistance Network (proscribed as a National Action splinter group in February 2020)

Tell MAMA documented the racist, homophobic tactics of NS131 and the System Resistance Network in the summer of 2017, documenting the links between National Action and the System Resistance Network in September of that year. Unfortunately, as noted above, the proscription took several years to occur.

An offshoot of the System Resistance Network, later proscribed, was the Sonnenkrieg Division; more broadly, other neo-Nazi groups proscribed include The Base (the US-bad neo-Nazi group with links to the infamous Atomwaffen Division).

Alex Davies is the twenty-fifth person convicted of links to the banned group.

Davies received two Prevent referrals (aged 15 and 19) in his teenage years and boasted that ‘nothing’ came of them. Political activities pre-National Action include membership in the youth wing of the neo-fascist British National Party and, later, an active member of Ukip.

He made headlines in 2016 after sharing a photo of himself performing a Nazi salute in the execution chamber at Buchenwald concentration camp – instigating a police and security service investigation in Germany.

A Mirror investigation into National Action in 2016 resulted in Davies leaving Warwick University.

Later jailed, other noted members of National Action include Alice Cutter, Mark Jones, Garry Jack, Connor Scothern, and the paedophile Jack Renshaw who went on to plot the murder of his local Labour MP Rosie Cooper and ex-Met Police probationary officer Benjamin Hannam. In late 2018, six convictions for membership of National Action occurred – those guilty were 27-year-old Daniel Bogunovic, 22-year-old Adam Thomas, Claudia Patatas, 33, 24-year-old Joel Wilmore, Darren Fletcher, 28, and 27-year-old Nathan Pyke. In addition, Christopher Lythgoe and Matthew Hankinson received prison sentences months earlier, with the police arresting Lythgoe as they investigated the plot to murder Rosie Cooper MP and a female police officer.

A leading figure within National Action before prescription, Wayne Bell (aka Wayne Jarvis, who has a history of violence), used Twitter and the Russian platform VK to post hundreds of violently racist, extremist material that included direct calls for the murder of Jewish communities. He also daubed neo-Nazi graffiti in his local area of Castleford before receiving a prison of four years and three months in May 2018.

In 2017, an ITV investigation detailed how former members of National Action were meeting in secret in training camps that fused ideological lectures and ideological violence – with sessions tailored toward boxing, street fights, and dealing with a knife attack. One former member of note cited in the ITV was Garron Helm (jailed in 2014 for sending racist tweets to the then Jewish Labour MP Luciana Berger).

The embryonic stages of National Action focused on the West Midlands, aligning closely with the tiny yet enduring neo-Nazi British Movement with one form of street militancy: stickers in public spaces. Taking inspiration from “autonomous national socialist movements” in Europe, National Action took its tactics to universities in 2014, for example, for recruitment purposes directly and via any media exposure it generated. Other racist agitations included an anti-halal demonstration in Coventry and desecrating the Nelson Mandela statue in Trafalgar Square with a banana during a protest.

The racist attempted murder of the Sikh dentist Dr Sarandev Bhambra by the neo-Nazi Zack Davies, who claimed membership of National Action, made headlines in 2015, and whilst they denied his membership, the leadership of National Action used Davies in their memetic propaganda on VK years later.

The racist militant agitations peaked in 2015 with violence in Liverpool (as they worked with Polish neo-fascists) and Dover, with members of National Action aligning with other small fascist groups to attack anti-fascist protesters on both occasions. On Holocaust Memorial Day that year, members held a racist flash demo proclaiming “Hitler was Right” as a different banner read “Refugees not Welcome”.

Members, of course, stockpiled weapons (including knives, crossbows, pump-action shotguns, and baseball bats) according to counter-terror police. A serving British soldier later identified as Mikko Vehvilainen – was jailed for eight years in 2018 for membership in the terror group and possessed “an arsenal of weapons and swastika bunting”. At the time of their conviction, Jack Coulson, aged 19, pleaded guilty to terror offences related to building a viable pipe bomb.

Four members of National Action went to prison in 2018 after vandalising Aston University in the West Midlands with various racist propaganda stickers in the summer of 2016. Alexander Deakin, the Midlands regional organiser, also belonged to a closed Telegram page named after the white supremacist terror group the Ku Klux Klan (named the Triple KKK Mafia) involved 21 members with a secondary group of seven members called Inner. Deakin would boast about how he got “redpilled by forums, spending years arguing online, and then finally deciding to take action when this group [National Action] impressed me”.

From violent training camps to small MMA training sessions, National Action always incorporated the promise of violence – to engineer in recruits (and indeed core members) the thrill of violence to accompany their uncompromising genocidal beliefs. Its leadership carefully cultivated and policed the uniform of it members to foster group image.

National Action used social media sites like VK as a recruiting platform – to promote their fight clubs and encourage new members.

As the academic Graham Macklin noted of their tactics, National Action positioned themselves as an unrelenting “revolutionary national socialist group, they consciously conceived of themselves as a youth-oriented ‘vanguard’ movement whose role, as political and spiritual elites, was to channel ‘hatred and rage’ and to ‘use it to shatter the decaying power of the enemy.”

The security services expressed their concerns about a growing cohort of young people drawn to far-right extremism in March (notably teenagers) – an age demographic National Action recruiters often sought out.

The post Neo-Nazi Alex Davies guilty of belonging to banned terror group National Action appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: far right extremism, Far Right groups, National Action, Neo-Nazi, News, terrorism

Neo-Nazi Alex Davies guilty of belonging to banned terror group National Action

The other co-founder of the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action was today (May 17) guilty of remaining a member of the proscribed group.

Alex Davies, 27, from Swansea, created the terror group alongside Benjamin Raymond (jailed for eight years in December 2021 for the same offence) in 2013.

Davies formed the National Action offshoot NS131 and had praised the System Resistance Network; both groups, alongside Scottish Dawn, all faced the same fate: proscription.

National Action (proscribed December 2016 – who never hid their desire to rebrand, writing on VK in 2016, “We will fight this in the courts or disband and organise under a new name”)

Scottish Dawn (proscribed September 2017)

NS131 (proscribed September 2017)

System Resistance Network (proscribed as a National Action splinter group in February 2020)

Tell MAMA documented the racist, homophobic tactics of NS131 and the System Resistance Network in the summer of 2017, documenting the links between National Action and the System Resistance Network in September of that year. Unfortunately, as noted above, the proscription took several years to occur.

An offshoot of the System Resistance Network, later proscribed, was the Sonnenkrieg Division; more broadly, other neo-Nazi groups proscribed include The Base (the US-bad neo-Nazi group with links to the infamous Atomwaffen Division).

Alex Davies is the twenty-fifth person convicted of links to the banned group.

Davies received two Prevent referrals (aged 15 and 19) in his teenage years and boasted that ‘nothing’ came of them. Political activities pre-National Action include membership in the youth wing of the neo-fascist British National Party and, later, an active member of Ukip.

He made headlines in 2016 after sharing a photo of himself performing a Nazi salute in the execution chamber at Buchenwald concentration camp – instigating a police and security service investigation in Germany.

A Mirror investigation into National Action in 2016 resulted in Davies leaving Warwick University.

Later jailed, other noted members of National Action include Alice Cutter, Mark Jones, Garry Jack, Connor Scothern, and the paedophile Jack Renshaw who went on to plot the murder of his local Labour MP Rosie Cooper and ex-Met Police probationary officer Benjamin Hannam. In late 2018, six convictions for membership of National Action occurred – those guilty were 27-year-old Daniel Bogunovic, 22-year-old Adam Thomas, Claudia Patatas, 33, 24-year-old Joel Wilmore, Darren Fletcher, 28, and 27-year-old Nathan Pyke. In addition, Christopher Lythgoe and Matthew Hankinson received prison sentences months earlier, with the police arresting Lythgoe as they investigated the plot to murder Rosie Cooper MP and a female police officer.

A leading figure within National Action before prescription, Wayne Bell (aka Wayne Jarvis, who has a history of violence), used Twitter and the Russian platform VK to post hundreds of violently racist, extremist material that included direct calls for the murder of Jewish communities. He also daubed neo-Nazi graffiti in his local area of Castleford before receiving a prison of four years and three months in May 2018.

In 2017, an ITV investigation detailed how former members of National Action were meeting in secret in training camps that fused ideological lectures and ideological violence – with sessions tailored toward boxing, street fights, and dealing with a knife attack. One former member of note cited in the ITV was Garron Helm (jailed in 2014 for sending racist tweets to the then Jewish Labour MP Luciana Berger).

The embryonic stages of National Action focused on the West Midlands, aligning closely with the tiny yet enduring neo-Nazi British Movement with one form of street militancy: stickers in public spaces. Taking inspiration from “autonomous national socialist movements” in Europe, National Action took its tactics to universities in 2014, for example, for recruitment purposes directly and via any media exposure it generated. Other racist agitations included an anti-halal demonstration in Coventry and desecrating the Nelson Mandela statue in Trafalgar Square with a banana during a protest.

The racist attempted murder of the Sikh dentist Dr Sarandev Bhambra by the neo-Nazi Zack Davies, who claimed membership of National Action, made headlines in 2015, and whilst they denied his membership, the leadership of National Action used Davies in their memetic propaganda on VK years later.

The racist militant agitations peaked in 2015 with violence in Liverpool (as they worked with Polish neo-fascists) and Dover, with members of National Action aligning with other small fascist groups to attack anti-fascist protesters on both occasions. On Holocaust Memorial Day that year, members held a racist flash demo proclaiming “Hitler was Right” as a different banner read “Refugees not Welcome”.

Members, of course, stockpiled weapons (including knives, crossbows, pump-action shotguns, and baseball bats) according to counter-terror police. A serving British soldier later identified as Mikko Vehvilainen – was jailed for eight years in 2018 for membership in the terror group and possessed “an arsenal of weapons and swastika bunting”. At the time of their conviction, Jack Coulson, aged 19, pleaded guilty to terror offences related to building a viable pipe bomb.

Four members of National Action went to prison in 2018 after vandalising Aston University in the West Midlands with various racist propaganda stickers in the summer of 2016. Alexander Deakin, the Midlands regional organiser, also belonged to a closed Telegram page named after the white supremacist terror group the Ku Klux Klan (named the Triple KKK Mafia) involved 21 members with a secondary group of seven members called Inner. Deakin would boast about how he got “redpilled by forums, spending years arguing online, and then finally deciding to take action when this group [National Action] impressed me”.

From violent training camps to small MMA training sessions, National Action always incorporated the promise of violence – to engineer in recruits (and indeed core members) the thrill of violence to accompany their uncompromising genocidal beliefs. Its leadership carefully cultivated and policed the uniform of it members to foster group image.

National Action used social media sites like VK as a recruiting platform – to promote their fight clubs and encourage new members.

As the academic Graham Macklin noted of their tactics, National Action positioned themselves as an unrelenting “revolutionary national socialist group, they consciously conceived of themselves as a youth-oriented ‘vanguard’ movement whose role, as political and spiritual elites, was to channel ‘hatred and rage’ and to ‘use it to shatter the decaying power of the enemy.”

The security services expressed their concerns about a growing cohort of young people drawn to far-right extremism in March (notably teenagers) – an age demographic National Action recruiters often sought out.

The post Neo-Nazi Alex Davies guilty of belonging to banned terror group National Action appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: far right extremism, Far Right groups, National Action, Neo-Nazi, News, terrorism

From Buffalo to Christchurch, how online fascism causes real-world terror

The racist terror that targeted Black communities in Buffalo, New York, in what the Buffalo Mayor, Byron Brown said, intended to kill “as many Black lives as possible“, left 10 dead and three injured.

Amongst the dead include 77-year-old Pearl Young, 86-year-old Ruth Whitfield, Roberta Drury, 32, 68-year-old Heyward Patterson, Geraldine Talley, 62, 65-year-old Celeste Chaney, 52-year-old Margus Morrison, Andre Mackneil, 53, 72-year-old Katherine “Kat” Massey, and the retired police officer and the heroic store security guard, Aaron Salter, aged 53.

Police named the three individuals injured: Jennifer Warrington, Zaire Goodman, and Christopher Braden.

Of the thirteen people shot, 11 were Black.

The 18-year-old neo-Nazi, Payton Gendron, stands accused of attempting to murder as many Black people as possible in Buffalo, New York, took inspiration from other far-right and white supremacist terrorists in the United States, Norway, Christchurch, and the UK.

A 180-page screed (referred to as a “manifesto” in news outlets) uploaded online and attributed to Gendron clarifies their fascist, neo-Nazi views and an obsession with the racist “Great Replacement” conspiracy – which draws mainstream credence in the United States despite continued condemnation.

The Amazon-owned platform Twitch removed the live stream video in two minutes (of the attacks occurring) – but the video quickly appeared on Twitter and Facebook. In addition, the N-word and “14” – a reference to the infamous white supremacist “fourteen words” mantra appeared on the rifle. A private Discord server is also under investigation – as Unicorn Riot reported on the chat logs, as they sought advice about tactical armour and weapons.

According to the New York Times, the accused also made threats against their high school, resulting in his arrest and a psychiatric evaluation aged 17, but he was released days later. Nor was Gendron on the red-flag list – a New York law enacted in 2019 where a judge issues an “extreme risk protection order” that prevents the person from owning or buying a gun.

The screed details how their racist views grew in their teenage years before crystalising on the notorious /pol/ (politically incorrect) board of 4Chan to call for accelerationist racist terror and destabilisation tactics in communities to harm Muslims and other minoritised groups.

Like the white supremacist terrorist who murdered 51 Muslims in Christchurch, this screed adopts an eco-fascist slant, which echoes traditional fascist calls for the violent rebirth of a mythologised society. However, for the historian Robert Paxton, fascism functions primarily as a “political behaviour marked by obsessive preoccupation with community decline, humiliation, or victimhood”, where emotion drives the violent actions as a tool of recruitment and inspires others to such horrific acts of terror and violence.

It’s crucial that in the age of digital and cyberfascism, such violent appeals to this mythologised nation-state exist beyond traditional borders, much like the internet connections which draw such individuals and groups together. In their paper “Fascism at eye level“, Douglas Holmes argued that cyberfascism today functions as a “disperse” problem that echoes beyond traditional national contexts and geographies. Such emerging technologies present fascism with various faces and reconfigurations.

Before taking selective extracts from the screed, it is essential to consider how digital subcultures can help facilitate the dehumanisation and others of minoritised groups into street-level forms of violence and terrorism. For example, in Cathrine Thorleifsson’s study on cyberfascism on 4chan’s/pol/ board, they argue that the role of echo chambers, when fused with a lack of counternarratives, and the creative process of creating fascist and racist memes, provides a ‘significant’ sense of agency and as a lightning rod for radicalisation through the unquestioning acceptance of the racist conspiracism that underpins white supremacist ideology. Such affective politics of fear grounded in the dehumanisation of minoritised groups, othering them as an existential threat, can inspire such violence and terror offline, as the above also helps build community beyond traditional borders.

Moreover, as Thorleifsson noted, the “gendered reconfiguration of fascist content and promotion of the urgency of the need of a national or racial rebirth” through the creative process which also “reflects a core feature of the fascist phenomena: the perception of an endangered community that need to be reborn through violent means.”

As we return to the screed, Gendron described accessing /pol/ during the covid-19 lockdowns of 2020, where they chanced upon a GIF of the Christchurch live stream. Then, wanting to understand more and be enthralled by the terror, they describe watching the terror attacks, accessing their screed, and how they “mostly agreed with him”. Before sanctifying the racist terror carried out by white supremacists – including Patrick Crusius, Anders Breivik, Dylann Roof, and John T Earnest.

Amongst various links of anti-Black racist pseudo-science and abhorrent memes, the screed links to a Telegraph article published in 2010, in which Richard Garside, director of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, called “racist claptrap” as “Crime is one of those areas of public policy where it is still respectable to seek explanations for behaviour in the colour of a person’s skin.”

Other racist memes targeting Black and Jewish communities found in the screed first appeared on the neo-Nazi white supremacist hate site, White Aryan Resistance, under the moniker “A Wyatt Man” in 2004 – the identity of whom has been a subject of much curiosity and investigation.

More modern racist memes about Jewish communities in the screed reinforce the historic antisemitic canard of so-called disproportionate influence in public life, blamed for all perceived social problems, as they call for genocide.

Transphobia appears in the screed, writing “LGB (drop the t)” and describing “transgenderism as a mental illness”. In addition, a racist meme blames Jewish communities for trans identities, reinforcing the above point.

Buried amongst the dizzying volume of racist anti-Black and anti-Jewish memes is a meme that blames the latter for criminal acts of child sexual exploitation in the UK – including a crude collection of headlines that further racialise the crime, which is not reflective of reviews into the backgrounds of such criminals, including from the Home Office.

The racialisation of Islam appears in the screed, othered to justify dehumanisation and violence. Therefore, it is no surprise that the screed also praises the Finsbury Park terrorist Darren Osborne (who they misspelt as Osbourne), the Christchurch terrorist, and the neo-Nazi Norweigan terrorist Philip Manshaus. The latter attempted to murder Muslims at a mosque after murdering his stepsister Johanne Zhangjia Ihle-Hansen in a racist shooting.

Buried towards the end of the screed is the further glorification of Patrick Crusius, John Earnest, Robert Bowers, Anders Breivik (spelt correctly this time), and Dylann Roof. Other notable white supremacist terrorists cited in this paragraph include Anton Lundin Pettersson and Luca Traini – a further example of how the Christchurch manifesto, including the narcissistic and psychotic Q&A section, took inspiration from the tragic events in New Zealand in March 2019.

The screed calls for the murder of the Jewish philanthropist and Holocaust survivor George Soros, the Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and London’s Mayor Sadiq Khan. Following this, we alerted the Metropolitan Police and Khan’s office. When asked about this, Khan told the press, “It’s been on public record that I receive police protection. “It’s unfortunate but it’s a fact of me being the mayor. “I’ve been incredibly safe because I’m looked after by dedicated, decent, brave police officers.”

President Joe Biden urged unity to address the “hate that remains a stain on the soul of America” in a press conference yesterday.

Authorities are still considering domestic terrorism charges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post From Buffalo to Christchurch, how online fascism causes real-world terror appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: Christchurch, Far Right groups, Fascism, Great Replacement, Neo-Nazi, News, terrorism

Vacancy: Oral History Project Worker – ‘From East to West’ Project

Faith Matters is a not-for-profit organisation that works on social cohesion, monitoring hate crimes and countering extremism. As part of the organisation’s core values, which involves promoting pluralism, Faith Matters is looking to capture the history of the arrival of Ugandan Asians after their expulsion from Uganda in 1972.

The project will mark the 50th anniversary of the arrival of Ugandan Asians and their settlement in the U.K. and it will seek to capture their experiences of settlement between 1972-1974. It will also seek to capture the impacts of the expulsion and resettlement on their mental and emotional well-being. The project will also develop a teaching guide for 14-16 year olds in U.K. schools to aid teaching and learning on the history of migration, identity and integration into the country.

The purpose of this role – Oral History Project Worker – is to assist Faith Matters and the management team in finding interviewees and collecting 25 oral history accounts from people who landed in August 1972. Alongside managing the interview process, the project worker will also be expected to collate relevant written material and photographs provided by interviewees and other members of the Ugandan Asian community, to digitise them and prepare them for archiving.

Where possible, the Oral History Project Worker will also assist the media team of Faith Matters in the filming of individuals and their personal experiences.

Responsibilities

As an experienced oral historian with a background in community-driven projects, supported by the wider team and an external consultant, you will central to the delivery of this Heritage Lottery Funded project. Responsibilities include:

– Assisting in the formulation and design of the methodology to deliver the project,
– Assisting in devising the questions that interviewees will respond to,
– Designing and undertaking oral interviews with individuals of Ugandan Asian heritage who arrived in 1972,
– Ensuring the detailed recording of information and materials from interviewees, including oral, written and pictorial histories,
– Ensuring that proper ethical and consent procedures are followed,
– Liaising with academic partner agencies around the archiving of material,
– Supporting the training and development of individuals of Ugandan Asian heritage in the collection of oral histories from their relatives or others of this heritage,
– Maintaining strong internal and external relationships.
– Assisting in the co-ordination of training days for individuals looking to undertake interviews within communities who have a Ugandan Asian heritage.
– Preparing, presenting and disseminating results in the form of reports, briefings, research papers and presentations,
– Advising external agencies and partners on social policy and working with partners or organisations who have an interest in areas that include migration, integration and identity

To Apply: To apply for this role, please send a full and updated CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words, setting out how you meet the essential responsibilities of the role outlined above. Please address each point so that we are able to fully consider how your experience, skills and abilities meet the needs of this post.

Applications should be sent to the Director of Faith Matters, Iman Atta OBE on info@faith-matters.co.uk. Applications should also include a possible start date. The closing date for applications is Monday the 30th of May at 5 pm.

We are looking to fill this post quickly, and therefore we will be interviewing on a rolling basis as applications come in and we reserve the right to make an appointment before the closing date. Applications should therefore be submitted as soon as is possible.

The post Vacancy: Oral History Project Worker – ‘From East to West’ Project appeared first on Faith Matters.

Categories: 50th anniversary, Collecting History, Idi Amin, Mental Health, Oral History, Ugandan Asian heritage, Ugandan Asians

Vacancy: Oral History Project Worker – ‘From East to West’ Project

Faith Matters is a not-for-profit organisation that works on social cohesion, monitoring hate crimes and countering extremism. As part of the organisation’s core values, which involves promoting pluralism, Faith Matters is looking to capture the history of the arrival of Ugandan Asians after their expulsion from Uganda in 1972.

The project will mark the 50th anniversary of the arrival of Ugandan Asians and their settlement in the U.K. and it will seek to capture their experiences of settlement between 1972-1974. It will also seek to capture the impacts of the expulsion and resettlement on their mental and emotional well-being. The project will also develop a teaching guide for 14-16 year olds in U.K. schools to aid teaching and learning on the history of migration, identity and integration into the country.

The purpose of this role – Oral History Project Worker – is to assist Faith Matters and the management team in finding interviewees and collecting 25 oral history accounts from people who landed in August 1972. Alongside managing the interview process, the project worker will also be expected to collate relevant written material and photographs provided by interviewees and other members of the Ugandan Asian community, to digitise them and prepare them for archiving.

Where possible, the Oral History Project Worker will also assist the media team of Faith Matters in the filming of individuals and their personal experiences.

Responsibilities

As an experienced oral historian with a background in community-driven projects, supported by the wider team and an external consultant, you will central to the delivery of this Heritage Lottery Funded project. Responsibilities include:

– Assisting in the formulation and design of the methodology to deliver the project,
– Assisting in devising the questions that interviewees will respond to,
– Designing and undertaking oral interviews with individuals of Ugandan Asian heritage who arrived in 1972,
– Ensuring the detailed recording of information and materials from interviewees, including oral, written and pictorial histories,
– Ensuring that proper ethical and consent procedures are followed,
– Liaising with academic partner agencies around the archiving of material,
– Supporting the training and development of individuals of Ugandan Asian heritage in the collection of oral histories from their relatives or others of this heritage,
– Maintaining strong internal and external relationships.
– Assisting in the co-ordination of training days for individuals looking to undertake interviews within communities who have a Ugandan Asian heritage.
– Preparing, presenting and disseminating results in the form of reports, briefings, research papers and presentations,
– Advising external agencies and partners on social policy and working with partners or organisations who have an interest in areas that include migration, integration and identity

To Apply: To apply for this role, please send a full and updated CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words, setting out how you meet the essential responsibilities of the role outlined above. Please address each point so that we are able to fully consider how your experience, skills and abilities meet the needs of this post.

Applications should be sent to the Director of Faith Matters, Iman Atta OBE on info@faith-matters.co.uk. Applications should also include a possible start date. The closing date for applications is Monday the 30th of May at 5 pm.

We are looking to fill this post quickly, and therefore we will be interviewing on a rolling basis as applications come in and we reserve the right to make an appointment before the closing date. Applications should therefore be submitted as soon as is possible.

The post Vacancy: Oral History Project Worker – ‘From East to West’ Project appeared first on Faith Matters.

Categories: 50th anniversary, Collecting History, Idi Amin, Mental Health, Oral History, Ugandan Asian heritage, Ugandan Asians

GUILTY: racist who called Muslim postmaster a ‘nonce’ and the P-word

A racist who targeted a Muslim postmaster with abhorrent slurs, including shouting “You nonce, you P*** b******”, received an 18-month community order at Newcastle Magistrates’ Court.

The Newcastle Chronicle reported that 34-year-old David Needham, who has a history of violence, including severe violence against a former partner, targeted Rafaqat Ali, who sadly since passed away, had requested that Needham cease shouting in December last year.

The newspaper further reported that Needham threatened Mr Ali, shouting further racist abuse, including, “Black b******”, before standing in front of the perspex screen separating him from Mr Ali and violently shaking it.

Despite fearing for his safety and the safety of his staff, the quick-thinking Mr Ali lowered the shutters to ensure that Needham could not leave until the police arrived.

An impact statement taken from Mr Ali before his death and read aloud in court stated: “I’m appalled that I was racially abused in my own store in 2021. This sort of behaviour should be confined to the Dark Ages, and I don’t expect to come to work and be a victim of such abuse. I hope this male feels the full force of justice.”

The racialised targeting of Muslim men, falsely accusing them of paedophilia, appear in various case studies that Tell MAMA continues to highlight – whether online or offline. For example, we reported on harassment, threats, abuse, on public transport, and when out in public – to the racist murder of pensioner Mushin Ahmed in Rotherham. In addition, various annual reports we have published provide in-depth analysis of how the far-right continues to hijack and weaponise such crimes to further anti-Muslim and Islamophobic hostility and animus.

The defence for David Needham argued that he had pleaded guilty and received financial assistance from his mother, owing to benefit sanctions.

The court fined him £120 and ordered him to pay £85 for costs and a £95 victim surcharge.

 

The post GUILTY: racist who called Muslim postmaster a ‘nonce’ and the P-word appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: hate crime, Newcastle, News

JAILED: racist carved swastikas into walls and subjected officers to racism

The racist who carved swastikas into walls with a knife and subjected police officers to racist abuse was jailed yesterday (May 5).

54-year-old Andy Koseda appeared at Snaresbrook Crown Court for sentencing following an earlier guilty plea.

On February 15, Met Police officers responded to a call at Westfield shopping centre in Stratford in east London.

Koseda caused damage to several walls after using a knife to carve swastikas into them – the Met Police statement does not specify the cost of the damage caused by such racist vandalism.

When attending officers detained Koseda, he made threats of violence and subjected them to racist abuse.

The prison sentence handed down will run for two years and six months for threats towards a person with a knife in a public place, racially aggravated harassment, criminal damage, possession of a knife, and threatening language to cause harassment.

 

 

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Categories: hate crime, London, News, Stratford, Swastika

Police investigating neo-Nazi “Great Replacement” stickers in Birmingham

West Midlands Police are investigating a series of white supremacist stickers pushing the racist so-called “Great replacement” conspiracy in parts of Birmingham, Tell MAMA can reveal.

A member of the public contacted us after finding one such sticker near Birmingham Central Mosque before safely removing it.

To not give the neo-Nazi(s) responsible additional propaganda, we are declining to reveal the entire contents of the sticker as the investigation remains ongoing.

But we will, however, state the racist language of the text does indeed push dangerous conspiracies about demographic change and that Islam will “dominate”. Three days ago, a different racist sticker surfaced on Telegram, including the line “national white minority by 2050”, appearing in an undisclosed area of Birmingham.

Our investigation of the social media accounts suggests that those responsible have also targeted areas like Digbeth in recent weeks.

We have, on several occasions, flagged content on Instagram under its Hate Speech guidelines, but so far, the platform has not acted.

Anyone can report graffiti in public areas on bins, benches, and public buildings to their local council, as with flyposting, which stickers constitute. For Birmingham City Council, it states that “If the fly-posting is racist or offensive, we will usually remove it within 1 working day”, – but that may vary based on the local authority in question.

Councils, however, will not remove graffiti or flyposting on private land or property – including cabinets owned by Virgin Media or BT (which means contacting the companies directly).

If you encounter such racist materials, take a photo and inform the police on 101 or online via TrueVision. Tell MAMA welcomes such reports and can report on your behalf or anonymously.

Remove stickers with a household key or similar object if you feel confident and it is safe to do so.

You can get advice from our confidential and free helpline on 0800 456 1226. Or through our free iOS or Android apps. Report through our online form. Or message us on WhatsApp on 0734 184 6086 or message us on Twitter or Facebook by following @tellmamauk.

 

 

 

The post Police investigating neo-Nazi “Great Replacement” stickers in Birmingham appeared first on TELL MAMA.

Categories: Birmingham, Far Right groups, graffiti, Neo-Nazi, News, sticker